History
 

Originally a Chapel of Ease to St Margaret's, financed by Lord Northbrook. It was consecrated on 12 December 1881 but only gained parish church status in 1888. The church was a plain red brick building with tiled roof and a bell turret, seating 550 people. A distinctive feature was the four large semi-circular windows. It was built by Maides & Harper of Croydon in 1881 and the Architect was Ernest Newton.

The church was extensively restored in the early 20th century; plans to rebuild it completely were drawn but never implemented.

This church was largely destroyed by firebombs in 1941, and was completely rebuilt in 1957. The old foundations and some portions of the old walls, varying in height from a few brick courses up to some 6 - 9 feet, are retained throughout the building except along the north aisle wall.

A 1978 reference to "an old corrugated hall on the site" may be to a temporary post-war chapel. The parish has a number of photographs of the old church.

The present building was rebuilt in 1957 after the original church, built in 1881, had been destroyed by fire in 1941. The old foundations and some portions of the old walls, varying in height from a few brick courses up to some 6 - 9 feet, are retained throughout the building except along the north aisle wall.

The building is of simple rectangular plan 100 feet by 50 feet but divided internally into a cruciform with barrel vaulted nave, transepts and chancel without clerestories with vestries flanking the chancel and aisles flanking the nave, but terminated at their western ends by two porches. The aisles are divided from the nave by a three-bay colonnade and each bay of the aisle is lit by five small semicircular headed windows. In the gable walls of chancel and transepts are three tall semi-circular headed windows, surmounted in the transept walls by a circular 'bull's-eye' window. The simple brick and tile exterior expresses the internal cruciform planning, which is emphasised by a small copper covered fleche rising from the crossing.

A number of fittings such as the choir stalls, wall panelling, pulpit and font come from the demolished church of St. Peter, Lee. The choir stalls have been described as some of the best work of Sir George Gilbert Scott.

In the early 1990's, the church was sub-divided to form a hall at the western end of the Nave and an outer south aisle has been added to provide parish accommodation.

100 years after the start of the First World War it is planned to re-create a replica of the wooden WW1 Memorial board that had hung on the north wall of the choir until the fire in 1941. It was dedicated at the Remembrance Sunday service on 9th November 2015.

The building is not listed.

From the records


The Church of the Good Shepherd, Lee
Consecrated by the Lord Bishop of Rochester, on the twelfth day of December, eighteen hundred and eighty one. For the first nine years, a Chapel-of-Ease to the Parish Church of Saint Margaret, Lee. On the third of June, eighteen hundred and eighty eight was constituted a Parish in the London Gazette of that date, the crown nominating the first Vicar. The Patron is the Rector of Lee for the time being ...
INCUMBENTS OF THE CHURCH
John A. OwenB.A. (Dunelm) L. Th1890-1918
Reginald W. BullockM.A. (Cantab)1918-1928
Hubert C. CarterM.A. (New York) B.D (Yale)1928-1930
Stephen R. FutersB.A. (Liverpool)1931-1934
Leslie HillsM.C.M.A. (Cantab)1935-1940
John B. PhillipsM.A. (Cantab) D.D. (Lambeth)1940-1944
Bertram L. TreanorM.A. (Oxon)1945-1951
Geoffrey T. Gray1951-1956
Eric F. SmithB.A. (London) B.D. (London) A.L.C.D.1956-1967
Owen N. EversonM.A.(Cantab)1967-1985
Lance S.C. HarveyM.I.E.E.1986-1992
John R. GilesM.A. (Cantab)1992-1998
Richard D. BainbridgeM.A. (Cantab)1999-2014
Bridget ShepherdM.A. (London)2014-

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WW1 Memorial board

Memorial board pic

text still to be written!


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 Church of The Good Shepherd with St Peter, Lee